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Japanese knotweed added to Kentucky’s Invasive Herbaceous Species list

Posted on by phlorum

In the state of Kentucky in the United States, dual bills have increased the listed number of noxious weeds and invasive herbaceous plant species.

The Department of Highways shall keep all state right-of-ways free of noxious-weeds. The species included in this list include the species of grass, Sorghum halepense, and the species of weed commonly known as giant foxtail, both of which are classed as noxious weeds, and the thistles Cirsium arvense and Carduus nutans, multiflora rose, wild cucumber, and black nightshade.

On written request the department shall give priority to any adjoining property owner engaged in a program of eradication of Johnson grass, giant foxtail, Canada thistles, nodding thistles, multiflora rose, kudzu, wild cucumber, and black nightshade; and shall cooperate with the adjoining owner by eradicating the Johnson grass, giant foxtail, Canada thistles, nodding thistles, multiflorarose, kudzu, wild cucumber, and black nightshade from the state’s right-of-ways. The department shall take steps to eradicate this grass and these weeds or thistles by the use of chemicals or any other means found to be effective by the department.

Under the bills, Japanese knotweed, marestail, poison hemlock, amure honeysuckle, kudzu and common teasel will all be added to the state’s list of invasive herbaceous species. Two Democrats supporting the bill are Sen. Dennis Parrett of Elizabethtown and Rep. Rita Smart of Richmond.

The plants that have been removed from the list include black nightshade, wild cucumber, giant foxtail, and nodding plumeless thistle.

Both of these bills were passed by their committees on unanimous votes. The bills now move to their respective chambers for further deliberation by the General Assembly.

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